Difference of 8 Protons Video Pieces: Carbon Dioxide :: Silicon Dioxide

Scientific Exploration, Shows, Time-Lapse

One of the pieces in my show “A Difference of 8 Protons” up at Bromfield Gallery through the month of March is an ephemeral installation piece involving dry ice and glass. As a record of the piece, I have taken time-lapse videos of the installation at a few different angles and have them up in an album on Vimeo. I will post the latest one here:

Pre-Thanksgiving Commute Composites

Commutes, Composites

Just in time for Turkey Day, two more composites from my Hyannis commute. Monday’s I shot from the back window, so it features the heating elements on the glass. In order, going, returning, combined:

20151123-CCCC-Commute-Going

20151123-CCCC-Commute-Returning

20151123-CCCC-Commute-Both

Today I tried to beat holiday traffic by leaving a little earlier, so the going composite has a lot of sunglare in it. For those images, the sun became a white hotspot in a sea of blue with the rest of the scene reduced to shadows. Thus, the scene shifts bluer than usual, there is more reflection from the dashboard, and the dust on the windshield is more highlighted. The returning commute was much longer that usual because of holiday traffic, and includes both a stop at the West Barnstable post office and at a paper store in Ball Square in Somerville.

20151125-CCCC-Commute-Going

20151125-CCCC-Commute-Returning

20151125-CCCC-Commute-Both

Only a couple weeks left of the semester, and probably and end to this round of commute composites.

Straight-Ahead Commute Composites

Commutes, Composites

This week I just went for a straight-ahead approach, and didn’t change the camera orientation between trips. This enabled me to get going, returning, and complete commute composites.

Monday:

20151102-CCCC-Commute-Going

20151102-CCCC-Commute-Returning

20151102-CCCC-Commute-Both

An interesting effect to notice, because we’re back on Standard Time, the returning commute is now shifted substantially toward sunset, so the colors are much redder. This effect carried over to the Wednesday commute:

20151104-CCCC-Commute-Going

20151104-CCCC-Commute-Returning

20151104-CCCC-Commute-Both

 

 

Nave Residency Day 10

Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

I finally got back to the gallery yesterday, but I was at the Bow & Arrow Press for Open Press Night afterward, so I didn’t get to process things until now. A big portion of yesterday’s work was 100 Random Pixel time-lapse videos, which I present here:

Time-Lapse 09 uses the same rules as the earlier ones, but 10 and after uses a different rule for dealing with obstructing pixels: instead of skipping over the obstructing pixels until a free space is reached, I now simply stack the new pixel on the obstructing pixel so that a three-dimensional form is created.

I also shot frames for a panorama of the two-tributary rope river from last time, and then constructed a three-tributary rope river with the last length of rope I had available:

Upper-Tributaries 3-Rope-River

I also shot a lot of portfolio images of the needlepoint rivers, as I had them on the wall for my artist’s talk last Sunday. Finally, I got out the ball chain I’d ordered just before I started the residency, and began experimenting with catenary curves.

Catenaries

This is the simple construction I made using the steel chain suspended on the hooks attached between the two lally columns in the gallery. I’m not entirely sure what’s going to happen with those, but we shall see.

After that experiment, I upended a desk and used the legs and cross supports to string the copper chain in various intersecting catenaries. I then started my camera shooting once every three seconds, and began agitating the chain. Below are some of the more interesting images, some with a touch of Photoshopping, some without. Further experimentation is definitely in the cards.

Finally, I’ll leave you with a lovely little curve from the steel suspensions that I shot on a whim:

Catenary-Intersection

Nave Residency, Day 8

Data Representation, Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

Today started off, oddly enough, as something of a clean-up day. I moved the trash bags I’m using as floor protectors for the wet projects, I shifted a bunch of the loose cubes over to where the river production area was, I cleaned up the pixel dice construction site, and collected boxes in one area and trash in another. I have some of the flow-pattern ink drawings in process, but I didn’t get around to photographing them. Next time!

For a consolation prize, here are the rivers, mostly complete. The clamp on the Mississippi is joining the Ohio/Upper Mississippi/Missouri complex to the Lower Mississippi/Red/Canadian/Arkansas complex. The clamp on the Yangtze is to hold together a faulty glue joint, which broke at around the Wuhan area.

Three-Pixel-Rivers

I also put the Random Pixel Objects on display on a plinth, just to get them out of the way:

Random-Pixel-Obects-Display

Nave Residency, Day 7

Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

Interesting stuff today. I was hoping to have images of all three pixel rivers done, but the Mississippi is being difficult and I needed to re-glue several tributaries, this time using clamps. I should have been using clamps the entire time!

But anyway, other stuff still got done. I finished all nine of the Random Pixel Objects, which are all available for sale to interested parties! Here they are in a group shot:

9-Random-Pixel-Objects

Skygrid 03: Spring 2013 to Spring 2014

Data Representation

At long last, the skygrid is done. A year ago, I started the process to capture an image of the zenith sky every two minutes from 4 in the morning until 9 at night. Today the Sun crossed back into the sky of the Northern Hemisphere, and the camera on my porch took the last set of photos of the zenith. Here is the color spread of the equinoctal day:

2014-Vernal-Equinox

And here is the final yearly grid, 495 x 365, or 180,675 separate squares (click to embiggen):

Skygrid-03-Avg-140320

I will be processing another time-lapse movie of the Winter Half of the skygrid when I have time. Until then, check out the Summer Half.

Rodeo Drive, Whiskey a Go Go, Hollywood & Vine in Composite

Icosacomposite Video

Three major landmarks in this selection of icosacomposites. While I was on the prowl, I couldn’t turn down the chance to deconstruct the conspicuous consumption of Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, especially the day after Christmas. And it didn’t disappoint. Look for high-end car wheels, fashion dress patterns and lots of shopping bags milling into a murky mass right in front of the Bvulgari store. I’m especially amused by how the diagonal crossing marks kind of stick up like stalagmites in the middle of the haze of tourism. Even weirder, no one seemed to care I was there shooting them.

Right after the Rodeo Drive shoot I went to Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood to capture another landmark, the nightclub Whisky a Go Go. Back in the day, it was the place to see The Byrds, Alice Cooper, Buffalo Springfield, Smokestack Lightning, Love and The Doors. At this point in history, it looks like it’s mostly serving the nostalgia circuit– Lita Ford and The Motels– with reality TV taking a slice of the pie. This particular video is the complete opposite of the Beverly Hills video. There’s hardly any people on Sunset the day after Christmas, so this became more of an examination of lights, traffic, and eveningtime, with the nightclub simply as an anchor. Because of that, I only shot 40 minutes of footage, which makes this video only two minutes long. Notice that the two-minute compositing slice is in quasi-synchronization with the timing of the traffic lights. In other videos, the red-amber-green lights are diffused and weak as they flicker in and out of phase, but here they’re remarkably strong and brilliant.

Finally, we revisit Hollywood and Vine, with a different crop than before. I like the placement of the buildings better, and the central building has a lovely diffuse glow as the compositing makes the shadows soften. Unfortunately, I was almost done with the fourth section of footage when some rentacops from Andrews International drove up and gave me the stink-eye from their car, so in the interests of keeping a low profile I finished recording and then moved on. The back end of their car was caught on video, but, alas, their moment of fame is indistinguishable in the composite. Because I only got 40 minutes of footage, this video is also only two minutes long.