Residency Wrapup, a Little Later Than Expected

Shows

Well, it took me longer than expected to cap off the residency posts with some shots of the closing reception, but better late than never. Here are some lovely images shot during the closing by Rebecca Philio, who has shot several receptions for the Nave Gallery through the years.

Residency-Closing-05

Myself and Jesa Damora at the refreshment table as things start. The three rope river, catenary experiments, needlepoint rivers, tetrahedral shapes and some agitated catenary prints are visible here.

Nave Residency Day 10

Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

I finally got back to the gallery yesterday, but I was at the Bow & Arrow Press for Open Press Night afterward, so I didn’t get to process things until now. A big portion of yesterday’s work was 100 Random Pixel time-lapse videos, which I present here:

Time-Lapse 09 uses the same rules as the earlier ones, but 10 and after uses a different rule for dealing with obstructing pixels: instead of skipping over the obstructing pixels until a free space is reached, I now simply stack the new pixel on the obstructing pixel so that a three-dimensional form is created.

I also shot frames for a panorama of the two-tributary rope river from last time, and then constructed a three-tributary rope river with the last length of rope I had available:

Upper-Tributaries 3-Rope-River

I also shot a lot of portfolio images of the needlepoint rivers, as I had them on the wall for my artist’s talk last Sunday. Finally, I got out the ball chain I’d ordered just before I started the residency, and began experimenting with catenary curves.

Catenaries

This is the simple construction I made using the steel chain suspended on the hooks attached between the two lally columns in the gallery. I’m not entirely sure what’s going to happen with those, but we shall see.

After that experiment, I upended a desk and used the legs and cross supports to string the copper chain in various intersecting catenaries. I then started my camera shooting once every three seconds, and began agitating the chain. Below are some of the more interesting images, some with a touch of Photoshopping, some without. Further experimentation is definitely in the cards.

Finally, I’ll leave you with a lovely little curve from the steel suspensions that I shot on a whim:

Catenary-Intersection

Nave Residency, Day 9

Drawing, Graphic Geography, Residency, Scientific Exploration

With Labor Day and various other stuff happening, I haven’t been able to get over to the Nave until late this afternoon. Alas, I was only there for a couple hours, mostly to make more repairs to the Mississippi and to lay the other two out on a different support system. The plinth wasn’t quite the right height, and both the Nile and Yangtze started sagging in weird ways. Evidently wooden cubes and wood glue are more pliable than originally expected. Here are the rivers in their new layouts, with clamps visible on the Mississippi:

Nile-Supports Mississippi-Repair Yangtze-Supports

I also took the opportunity to hang up the latest Flow Pattern drawings, made by dripping ink over wet paper that had been set over newsprint to make interesting topographies:

Flow-Patterns-07 Flow-Patterns-06 Flow-Patterns-05 Flow-Patterns-08

The black Flow Pattern drawings are made with reclaimed inkjet ink, which contains a certain amount of every ink used in professional-grade inkjets. So I was hoping that some kind of separation would happen as the ink dried, and different colors would become visible against the composite black shade. And, indeed, there are areas of cyan and magenta bleeding through the basic black in certain areas of these drawings:

Flow-Pattern-Inkjet-Detail-02 Flow-Pattern-Inkjet-Detail-01

Finally, I pieced together another Tetra Experiments piece, this time following a pattern: I started with a basic zigzag line, then added an extension with three empty sleeves to every third segment. I then attached it to an earlier piece, the one curled around the pole with a cube held in a little cage.

Tetra-Experiments-08

Nave Residency, Day 6

Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency

I spent most of the day fixing up the 3D pixel Nile, 3D pixel Yangtze, and piecing together the last bits of the 3D pixel Mississippi. Here’s a quick shot of the Nile, resting on a table:

BwDt9XaCQAA3Yn8

I also constructed five ephemeral Random Pixel Objects and three physical Random Pixel Objects. I forgot to snap a photo of the physical ones, but I shot video of the making of the five ephemeral ones. Here are the five Objects:

Grayscale-Pixel-Shape-Concat-03

And here’s the video showing exactly how I’m making them:

I also started a very silly project, making river patterns out of nylon rope. I shot various frames of the running length, and I tried to use an automated stitcher to fit them all together, but it looks like I’ll need to do that manually. Tomorrow!

Needlepoint Gallery

Needlework

I’d been working on them piecemeal for a while, but I had the chance to really sit down and work on some needlepoint pieces while I was at Somerville Open Studios on May 3rd and 4th. Here’s a gallery of what I’ve been working on.

Analemma-SolsticesThis is the analemma, the shape that the sun traces out during the course of the year. I have marked the dates of the solstices at the minimum and maximum points.

Multilayered Holographic Composite, 59 Samples

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Another iteration of the Multilayered Holographic Composite, with help from my Graphic Design intro class at NHIA:

Holographic-Composite-59

It’s starting to coalesce around the basic letterforms, although “Multilayered” is fuzzier than the other words because there’s a much larger spread of word lengths between different handwriting styles.

If you’d like to be included, please, feel free!

 

Random Sketchbook Montage

Drawing, Random Processes

I’m certain that everyone was as curious as I was to see what would happen if I ran all the random walks in the Random Sketchbook together as a single path. Well, good news! I put them all in Photoshop and joined them end-end-end as best as I could, and came up with one of several versions of the continuous pathway. (Actually, one of 3.96 x 10^28 pathways, assuming a coin-toss between joining either the start point or the end point to the free end of the previous pathway.) How exciting!

Actually, I think it’s pretty cool, and it was fun seeing exactly how this path would develop. I marked the start point and end point with a red dot and an arrow. It’s here below, click to embiggen:

Random-Sketchbook-Montage-Small

New Sketchbook: RANDOM

Drawing, Random Processes

Last summer one of my students gave me two lovely stab-bound sketchbooks. I normally don’t use sketchbooks, but it was a very thoughtful gift, and I figured I should probably put them to use. I already described the process I used in the SIXTY sketchbook, so now I am here to unveil the second one: RANDOM.

As with my other random walk projects, I simply use a spinner and some sort of marking utensil to trace out the random directions the spinner points. In this case, I used a bit of ribbed plastic with one end marked black and an aluminum pushpin as a spinner, and a whole passel of Prismacolor markers — in fact, the same ones I used in SIXTY. (I attempted to pull the markers out of my backpack in as random as fashion as possible, but there seemed to be a preponderance of Parrot Green, Pink and Mulberry in the selections.) Here’s a pic of the spinner:

Random-Tools

I started from approximately the center of each sheet, and drew random lines until the line fell off the page, and then started again at the center. This way, I’d make sure I had the longest line possible, because starting anywhere else would tend to lead to shorter lines.