A Gallery of Various Random Walks

Random Processes

Looking through all my posts, I realized I’d posted a whole bunch of the time-lapse walks and various other walks, but not any earlier walks. How silly of me! Let me post a quick gallery of the walks I’ve done in the past. Here are the Field Walks, which I performed using 300′ of nylon rope in a nearby football field and on the beach in Provincetown.

Residency Wrapup, a Little Later Than Expected

Shows

Well, it took me longer than expected to cap off the residency posts with some shots of the closing reception, but better late than never. Here are some lovely images shot during the closing by Rebecca Philio, who has shot several receptions for the Nave Gallery through the years.

Residency-Closing-05

Myself and Jesa Damora at the refreshment table as things start. The three rope river, catenary experiments, needlepoint rivers, tetrahedral shapes and some agitated catenary prints are visible here.

Nave Residency, Day 12

Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency, Shows

Not really a true work day, just a quick organization day to prepare for the closing reception tomorrow evening. I threw out trash, rationalized the box situation for later packing, put away cameras, pens and pencils, and collected stuff to take home tomorrow morning. Once everything was tidied up, I set out a TV and DVD player so I can show a montage of my random pixel creations, and did some quick final setups:

Final-100-Pixel-Object

The final color Random Pixel Object.

Final-Grayscale-RPO

Nave Residency Day 10

Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

I finally got back to the gallery yesterday, but I was at the Bow & Arrow Press for Open Press Night afterward, so I didn’t get to process things until now. A big portion of yesterday’s work was 100 Random Pixel time-lapse videos, which I present here:

Time-Lapse 09 uses the same rules as the earlier ones, but 10 and after uses a different rule for dealing with obstructing pixels: instead of skipping over the obstructing pixels until a free space is reached, I now simply stack the new pixel on the obstructing pixel so that a three-dimensional form is created.

I also shot frames for a panorama of the two-tributary rope river from last time, and then constructed a three-tributary rope river with the last length of rope I had available:

Upper-Tributaries 3-Rope-River

I also shot a lot of portfolio images of the needlepoint rivers, as I had them on the wall for my artist’s talk last Sunday. Finally, I got out the ball chain I’d ordered just before I started the residency, and began experimenting with catenary curves.

Catenaries

This is the simple construction I made using the steel chain suspended on the hooks attached between the two lally columns in the gallery. I’m not entirely sure what’s going to happen with those, but we shall see.

After that experiment, I upended a desk and used the legs and cross supports to string the copper chain in various intersecting catenaries. I then started my camera shooting once every three seconds, and began agitating the chain. Below are some of the more interesting images, some with a touch of Photoshopping, some without. Further experimentation is definitely in the cards.

Finally, I’ll leave you with a lovely little curve from the steel suspensions that I shot on a whim:

Catenary-Intersection

Nave Residency, Day 8

Data Representation, Graphic Geography, Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

Today started off, oddly enough, as something of a clean-up day. I moved the trash bags I’m using as floor protectors for the wet projects, I shifted a bunch of the loose cubes over to where the river production area was, I cleaned up the pixel dice construction site, and collected boxes in one area and trash in another. I have some of the flow-pattern ink drawings in process, but I didn’t get around to photographing them. Next time!

For a consolation prize, here are the rivers, mostly complete. The clamp on the Mississippi is joining the Ohio/Upper Mississippi/Missouri complex to the Lower Mississippi/Red/Canadian/Arkansas complex. The clamp on the Yangtze is to hold together a faulty glue joint, which broke at around the Wuhan area.

Three-Pixel-Rivers

I also put the Random Pixel Objects on display on a plinth, just to get them out of the way:

Random-Pixel-Obects-Display

Nave Residency, Day 7

Random Processes, Residency, Scientific Exploration

Interesting stuff today. I was hoping to have images of all three pixel rivers done, but the Mississippi is being difficult and I needed to re-glue several tributaries, this time using clamps. I should have been using clamps the entire time!

But anyway, other stuff still got done. I finished all nine of the Random Pixel Objects, which are all available for sale to interested parties! Here they are in a group shot:

9-Random-Pixel-Objects

Random Sketchbook Montage

Drawing, Random Processes

I’m certain that everyone was as curious as I was to see what would happen if I ran all the random walks in the Random Sketchbook together as a single path. Well, good news! I put them all in Photoshop and joined them end-end-end as best as I could, and came up with one of several versions of the continuous pathway. (Actually, one of 3.96 x 10^28 pathways, assuming a coin-toss between joining either the start point or the end point to the free end of the previous pathway.) How exciting!

Actually, I think it’s pretty cool, and it was fun seeing exactly how this path would develop. I marked the start point and end point with a red dot and an arrow. It’s here below, click to embiggen:

Random-Sketchbook-Montage-Small

New Sketchbook: RANDOM

Drawing, Random Processes

Last summer one of my students gave me two lovely stab-bound sketchbooks. I normally don’t use sketchbooks, but it was a very thoughtful gift, and I figured I should probably put them to use. I already described the process I used in the SIXTY sketchbook, so now I am here to unveil the second one: RANDOM.

As with my other random walk projects, I simply use a spinner and some sort of marking utensil to trace out the random directions the spinner points. In this case, I used a bit of ribbed plastic with one end marked black and an aluminum pushpin as a spinner, and a whole passel of Prismacolor markers — in fact, the same ones I used in SIXTY. (I attempted to pull the markers out of my backpack in as random as fashion as possible, but there seemed to be a preponderance of Parrot Green, Pink and Mulberry in the selections.) Here’s a pic of the spinner:

Random-Tools

I started from approximately the center of each sheet, and drew random lines until the line fell off the page, and then started again at the center. This way, I’d make sure I had the longest line possible, because starting anywhere else would tend to lead to shorter lines.

Random Walks on the Beach

Random Processes

This Christmas I went to California, and while I was there I took the opportunity to do some random walks in the sand in Huntington Beach. The dry sand above the waterline was too loose to really get a good line, so I ended up down by the surf to get a better mark. The only problem with that, of course, is that the surf would erase some of my work every few minutes. So, the resulting walks were rather quick and ephemeral! I did shoot some frames for compositing, but I’m not sure how good they’ll look. Here are the four time-lapse walks I did, run together in a single video.