Upgraded “Internet Swadesh” Site

Data Representation, Internet Art, Linguistic Deconstruction

My dream of having the Internet Swadesh website be a completely automated and daily glimpse on the linguistic proclivities of the Internet was not going to come true anytime soon, so I decided to get things working manually. So I updated the site to a simple WordPress install and went to Google Image Search myself to get image results for each of the 208 Swadesh terms in English. I’m going to try to update these myself every month for now, and maybe throw in some other languages as I have time.

So not much to see now, but hopefully it will get better as the year progresses.

Quick Shot of a New Linguistic Letterpress Piece

Letterpress, Linguistic Deconstruction

Here’s a quick cellphone shot of my new letterpress piece, “The Sounds of English”:

Sounds-of-English-Preview

The gray line in the middle represents all of the sounds used in the English language as coded through the International Phonetic Alphabet. The top and bottom lines, the title of the piece in the IPA and in English orthography, are supposed to be 342 green, but the color didn’t really come through. The 26 letters we use in the alphabet that may or may not correspond to any particular speech sound are embossed behind the IPA symbols, but that particular detail is even harder to see here.

I’ll edition these on Sunday, and will get a better shot then, but I figured I’d post this now.

Multilayered Holographic Composite, 59 Samples

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Another iteration of the Multilayered Holographic Composite, with help from my Graphic Design intro class at NHIA:

Holographic-Composite-59

It’s starting to coalesce around the basic letterforms, although “Multilayered” is fuzzier than the other words because there’s a much larger spread of word lengths between different handwriting styles.

If you’d like to be included, please, feel free!

 

More Layers in the Holographic Composite

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Thanks to my students in my Intro to Graphic Design class, I now have 32 samples of handwriting to compare:
Holographic-Composite-32

It’s interesting, but not quite what I wanted. I used the boxes to try to keep things aligned and corralled, but I’m starting to think I’ll need to normalize the sizes of the samples so I can get better alignment. That might take some time, and I’ll need to remove the boxes while I’m doing it.

Again, I would like to extend an invitation to all denizens of the Interwebs to be part of this interesting process! Simply download the instructions and sample sheet here, follow the directions, and viola! Internet celebrity awaits. I will repeat the instructions here:

1. Print the second page of this PDF. Try not to scale the PDF when printing; i.e. turn off “Fit to Page”.

2. Obtain standard black fine-point Sharpie.

3. Write “Multilayer Holographic Composite” in the three boxes provided, one word per box. See above example. You may write it any way you desire.

4A. Scan page at 600 dpi, grayscale, include the four little dots. Email tedol@mindhuestudio.com for Dropbox access.

— OR —

4B. Mail page to:

Holographic Composite
c/o Mindhue Studio

17 Wheeler Ave #2
Medford, MA 02155

5. Wipe hands on pants.

Multilayered Holographic Composite – And You’re Invited!

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Another composite project, and this one with an interactive component! I decided to do a composite of handwriting samples, and got my summer school class and the regular attendees at the Bow & Arrow’s Open Press Night to supply the first round. I prepared a standard sampling sheet and had everyone write “Multilayered Holographic Composite” in standard black Sharpie. This is what 20 handwriting samples look like squished together:

Holographic-Composite-20

I would like to extend an invitation to all denizens of the Interwebs to be part of this interesting process! Simply download the instructions and sample sheet here, follow the directions, and viola! Internet celebrity awaits. I will repeat the instructions here:

1. Print the second page of this PDF. Try not to scale the PDF when printing; i.e. turn off “Fit to Page”.

2. Obtain standard black fine-point Sharpie.

3. Write “Multilayered Holographic Composite” in the three boxes provided, one word per box. See above example. You may write it any way you desire.

4A. Scan page at 600 dpi, grayscale, include the four little dots. Email tedol@mindhuestudio.com for Dropbox access.

— OR —

4B. Mail page to:

Holographic Composite
c/o Mindhue Studio

17 Wheeler Ave #2
Medford, MA 02155

5. Wipe hands on pants.

PostArtPoetry: “IHDRkXTPLTEttXX//”, a PNG poem

Internet Art, Linguistic Deconstruction

In honor of the Post-Art Poets (@postartpoets), whose motto is THE TIMELINE OF ART HISTORY MUST BE ABANDONED IN THE NAME OF PROGRESS, I have interpreted their logo as its own form of machine poetry, reproduced below in both full representation and as edited to retain all English text letters.

Full Poem:

PNG

IHDRkXTPLTEttXX//

]],,ggTTAA<<qqhh”EE66YYJJbb22rr33DD–44yySS[[iillzz::**FF__

>>ssOONN!!        0088&&aa$$ZZMMGGKKRR11II))PPnnUUpp;;LL77~~dd??..jj%%}}^^BBHH””{{WW@@kkffooy&IDATxCeE%BMe5]HSBtIS;2CRC]Jsgd;wf`08 m=`B\ $Qb G@Hc `H] $HgNiBhwC t9(@&m56.l;n=|gAiWo

N(@_Brr]rE?o48@3x@_P7Wd3Zb’Z NBFDl_7)PtPX`T
@FEh ZlO653-|c572!;\d@P’
@duB.].G2k<o04e3t”,r{Q`9!+_86@S5’+!1T7w\<tV@3Y,.<Kp_d.n[`Xic h%T4n5%\QXDUTD    PFOZ<;g)u5}:YPF^`k.L%z@QgF
reeCFu>(Ma{B>tC7@0l    q”`hh(:N2@k@QwQY)9fe’`W60_
/:@6
Uo/I_0@:_0″TNvS3}k+zJ$4E@tt@-<0x’E`-g+f<nqtX3kwkF532aNY-t1W!P. k<~UA(odoV7@_Uq{C
`,
oX`th:
v`aw>|wk    @4.Y0sP]04dW”@{z5_1/A3_1C pu]`};’5@i<i@tX|&”M5U7_T[(i?!N\}&]DZA`i}U=l~F~sw{U_3 ,WO2@Wj{Uehyidc2q]@fMy-G^    S”q|~I5&%ue
72&]    W{7MTP
*2z7k+S8dJdF>N8^n]ooGyIGeYA(P`bh4`k
@hgdaX6X5p`qM)[zli`C.0,:g@-I@:9_j\hO;=v-5`=Gr/    2t@A@@@@fxmLm
}}c+:0@pCmF]&gkA3LP?M&`7T:CK    @sw4y/ey@V.7-.,7TO0*KBh]@wc38Lr!\?]+5@0KK@3P,5tvG,l%$C{|&QZB@@@WQX<R`0f4J
L0`0*0jN8_IENDB`

English Text Version:

PNG

IHDRkXTPLTEttXX

ggTTAAqqhhEEYYJJbbrrDDyySSiillzzFF

ssOONN        aaZZMMGGKKRRIIPPnnUUppLLddjjBBHHWWkkffooyIDATxCeEBMeHSBtISCRCJsgdwf mB Qb GHc H HgNiBhwC tmngAiWo

NBrrrEo483xPWdZbZ NBFDlPtPXT
FEh ZlOcdP
duBGkoetrQSTwtVYKpdnXic hTnQXDUTD    PFOZguYPFkLzQgF
reeCFuMaBtCl    qhhNkQwQYfeW

UoITNvSkzJEttxEgfnqtXkwkFaNYtWP kUAodoVUqC

oXth
vawwk    YsPdWzAC puiitXMUTiNDZAiUlFswU3 WOWjUehyidcqfMyG    SqIue
WMTP
zkSdJdFNnooGyIGeYAPbhk
hgdaXXpqMzliCgIjhOvGr    tAfxmLm
cpCmFgkALPMTCK    swyeyVTOKBhwcLrKKPtvGlCQZBWQXRfJ
LjNIENDB

 Machine-Readable Translation:

54302f6a68d7ace23530650304f8d269-1

 

Two More Alphabets

Data Representation, Linguistic Deconstruction

Alphabets again. I was lettering some notes this morning and got interested in the number of strokes it took me to write capital letters, and then I started thinking about strokes of the pen vs. visual line elements, and one thing led to another. Here are two newly-reordered alphabets based on those two concepts.

AlphabetStrokes

AlphabetElements

Note: For “visual line elements” I consider the separation as a hard angle between components of the letter; in other words, “U” has one line element because it has a smooth curve linking the arms, while “V” has two because the join is an angle. Also, this ordering only works for my handwritten capitals (or any typeface that follows this style), because I put crossbars on the I, J and Z. Finally, the ordering within number sets depends on the values from the other set. For example, in the line elements set, W and M both have four elements, but W is listed before M because W uses only one stroke and M uses two. Hopefully that’s not too confusing.