Second Set of Automobile Commute Pictures

Commutes, Composites

The joys of suction cup mounts! Here’s a set with the mount stuck to the sunroof glass and the camera pointing forward. (The camera was also hanging upside-down, but the joys of Photoshop means that that is easily corrected.) The two images, “Going” and “Returning”, are somewhat different because I take the camera with me when I go in to class; the parking lot at CCCC is big and I don’t want to give anyone the opportunity to grab a free camera.

20150923-CCCC-Commute-Going

20150923-CCCC-Commute-Returning

Both of these use automatic exposure settings, so the color is consistent. There are portions of the scene that shouldn’t move, like the mirror, the dashboard and the little Lego guy sitting in his spaceship, but the camera does vibrate on the end of the mount so it blurs the resulting composite. I think the next set will be with the camera again on the sunroof but pointing toward me and the steering wheel. Then I could reverse it and have it pointing out the passenger-side window.

For each new week, I think I’ll just post the new ones on Wednesday or Thursday.

New Round of Composite Commutes

Commutes, Composites

I’m driving to Hyannis on the Cape to teach Photoshop this fall, so I decided to do another round of commute composites, this time in an automobile, and this time with a mount for the camera. These will be a little less amorphous in terms of framing, but the suction cup mount means I’ll be mounting the camera on various pieces of glass all around the car, so there will be an interesting variety of perspectives to examine.

Here’s the first round, done with the camera mounted on the dash. The difference in color is because I tried the first one with a fixed exposure, but didn’t like the overexposed/underexposed gamut that resulted. The second is done with the camera automatically setting the exposure, so there’s less whiteout/blackout in the images. I’ll probably keep it on automatic from now on.

20150921-CCCC-Commute-Going

Going to the Cape, 21 September 2015

20150921-CCCC-Commute-Returning

Coming back from the Cape, 21 September 2015

Multilayered Holographic Composite, 59 Samples

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Another iteration of the Multilayered Holographic Composite, with help from my Graphic Design intro class at NHIA:

Holographic-Composite-59

It’s starting to coalesce around the basic letterforms, although “Multilayered” is fuzzier than the other words because there’s a much larger spread of word lengths between different handwriting styles.

If you’d like to be included, please, feel free!

 

More Layers in the Holographic Composite

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Thanks to my students in my Intro to Graphic Design class, I now have 32 samples of handwriting to compare:
Holographic-Composite-32

It’s interesting, but not quite what I wanted. I used the boxes to try to keep things aligned and corralled, but I’m starting to think I’ll need to normalize the sizes of the samples so I can get better alignment. That might take some time, and I’ll need to remove the boxes while I’m doing it.

Again, I would like to extend an invitation to all denizens of the Interwebs to be part of this interesting process! Simply download the instructions and sample sheet here, follow the directions, and viola! Internet celebrity awaits. I will repeat the instructions here:

1. Print the second page of this PDF. Try not to scale the PDF when printing; i.e. turn off “Fit to Page”.

2. Obtain standard black fine-point Sharpie.

3. Write “Multilayer Holographic Composite” in the three boxes provided, one word per box. See above example. You may write it any way you desire.

4A. Scan page at 600 dpi, grayscale, include the four little dots. Email tedol@mindhuestudio.com for Dropbox access.

— OR —

4B. Mail page to:

Holographic Composite
c/o Mindhue Studio

17 Wheeler Ave #2
Medford, MA 02155

5. Wipe hands on pants.

Multilayered Holographic Composite – And You’re Invited!

Composites, Linguistic Deconstruction

Another composite project, and this one with an interactive component! I decided to do a composite of handwriting samples, and got my summer school class and the regular attendees at the Bow & Arrow’s Open Press Night to supply the first round. I prepared a standard sampling sheet and had everyone write “Multilayered Holographic Composite” in standard black Sharpie. This is what 20 handwriting samples look like squished together:

Holographic-Composite-20

I would like to extend an invitation to all denizens of the Interwebs to be part of this interesting process! Simply download the instructions and sample sheet here, follow the directions, and viola! Internet celebrity awaits. I will repeat the instructions here:

1. Print the second page of this PDF. Try not to scale the PDF when printing; i.e. turn off “Fit to Page”.

2. Obtain standard black fine-point Sharpie.

3. Write “Multilayered Holographic Composite” in the three boxes provided, one word per box. See above example. You may write it any way you desire.

4A. Scan page at 600 dpi, grayscale, include the four little dots. Email tedol@mindhuestudio.com for Dropbox access.

— OR —

4B. Mail page to:

Holographic Composite
c/o Mindhue Studio

17 Wheeler Ave #2
Medford, MA 02155

5. Wipe hands on pants.

Tenth Round of QRs in the Wild

Composites, Data Representation

300… I’ve captured 300 QRs. Here’s the group average, as shot:

(the graininess comes from the fact I photographed three or four QRs on computer monitors this time around)

Generated average:

Average of all 300, as shot–

And all 300, freshly generated:

Since 300 is a big and round number, I figured I’d do another breakdown of the QRs by size, generating averages that are slightly more meaningful because there’s greater overlap. (Here’s the first one.) First, the histogram of QR sizes (given in pixels on the bottom axis):

For the pixel sizes with more than one entry, here are those composites:

216 pixels:

248 pixels:

280 pixels:

312 pixels:

344 pixels:

376 pixels:

408 pixels:

504 pixels:

These averages clearly show the control blocks, the orientation blocks, and the data fields used int he QR specification.